ExTV Presents: Forward – A Black History Month Celebration

As February rolls around, we celebrate Black History Month. Reflecting on our last year’s BHM Screening Event and previous programming, we put together a web program for this month to reflect and celebrate on some of our favorite works created by black and afro-diasporic students at SAIC. Named “Forward” after Lawrence Pearson’s video, produced in the name of the #BlackLivesMatter movement in attempt to protest racialized violence and police brutality. In the name of “Forward”, we seek to imagine a better future, in which black and brown people are able to live safely and thrive in a world where blackness and brownness are not othered and sensationalized but rather celebrated and respected. This month’s featured artists are shown as listed:

 

“Hivyo Tete” – Darryl Terrell (2016)

(@00:07)

Coming from the social media hashtag #MasculinitySoFragile. I wanted to depict black men who are often looked at as hyper masculine, strong, etc, as some other then that, black men can, men in general can have softer side, men can have emotions, It’s my Visual way of say to men, but to black men specific that it’s ok to be fragile, it’s ok to feel weak at time, it ok.”

 “Sly’s Cut” – Jyquan Stewart (2016)

(@02:10)

A film about a barber named, Sly who tells his story.

 

 

“Coonature” – Nick Williams (2007)

(@05:51)

My thoughts on the one way street that is stereotyping and the consequences given to one side and not the other.

 

 “Forward” – Lawrence Pearson (2015)

(@08:25)

2014 – 12 mile march in Chicago on Black Friday against excessive use of deadly force by police on unarmed Americans such as Tamir Rice, Eric Garner, Sandra Bland, Laquan Mcdonald etc. Separate protest against black on black crimes and police brutality is included starring  Triston Antoine and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago with poetry by Safiya James with a speech from The Peace Circle.

“Ciguapx” – Jesùs Hilario-Reyes (2018)

(@12:30)

A narrative delineating from indigenous (Taino) story telling depicting what we know as the Succubus. As defined as a female demon believed to have sexual intercourse with sleeping men who then eats/kills her prey. The Ciguapa is characterized with long hair and backwards feet. Ciguapx is a queering of this narrative, exploring themes such as queer archetypical representation and its subversion, gender representation, and the Bruja. Teetering with vogue aesthetics and queer nightlife this work seeks to re-imagine a cultural identity.